TFK Article on Darfur

Looking Evil in the Face

President Bush calls for an end to violence in Sudan

By Nellie Gonzalez Cutler

For the past four years, the Darfur region of Sudan, in Africa, has been ripped apart by violence. More than 200,000 people have been killed and 2.5 million have been driven from their homes. Each month, thousands of refugees die as a result of disease, malnutrition and lack of clean water. On Wednesday, President George W. Bush, said the bloodshed must stop. “The brutal treatment of innocent civilians in Darfur is unacceptable,” said Bush. “(It) must end.”


At the Abu Shouk refugee camp in Darfur, women line up to receive blankets.
ALFRED DE MONTESQUIOU—AP

The President said that the United States would take concrete measures to force the government of Sudan to abide by peace agreements. If Sudan’s government fails to act properly, the U.S. will impose strict economic penalties on Sudan. American companies will be barred from doing business with Sudan. Individuals committing violent acts in Sudan will not be allowed to do business with American citizens or companies.

The world must actBush spoke at a ceremony at the Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. The museum is devoted to preserving the memory of the estimated 6 million Jewish people who were killed by members of Germany’s Nazi Party during World War II. This week marks Holocaust Remembrance Week. Bush said that the museum serves as a reminder to the world that it must not allow evil acts to be committed. “The only way to defeat (evil) is to look it in the face, and not back down,” he said.

The President compared the Nazis’ plan to exterminate the Jewish people with the crisis in Darfur. “Genocide is the only word for what is happening in Darfur, and we have a moral obligation to stop it,” Bush said.

Google, an Internet search company, has joined ranks with the Holocaust Museum to let the world see what is going on in Darfur. By using Google Earth, people can view the destruction in Darfur. They can see burnt-out homes, makeshift tent villages and people struggling to survive.

Broken promisesThe problems in Darfur began with an uprising of black Africans against what they viewed as discrimination by the predominantly Arab government. Both groups are Muslim. In response, Sudan’s president, Omar al-Bashir, called on local tribes to put down the rebellion. Armed Arab bandits, called Janjaweed, began attacking black African farmers.

The United States and the United Nations (U.N.) have brokered several agreements between the Sudanese government and rebel groups. The Sudanese government has promised to disarm the Janjaweed. This week, the government agreed to accept 3,000 U.N. troops, who will work with African Union forces to try to bring security and peace to the region.

But the Sudanese government has a history of breaking its agreements. “The time for promises is over,” vowed Bush. “President Bashir must act.”

3 responses

  1. annor

    Dear Mr. President

    I am tired of people dieing in Darfur. I learned about it in school. I think it would be a good thing if you could help stop all the killing. Listen to me stop, don’t send the killers food or money. Please do what you can to make them stop.

    From Annor

    April 24, 2007 at 10:55 am

  2. Dear Mr. President,

    My name is Giovanni and I heard about what is happening in Darfur. I would like to help the people in Darfur as an American Citizen. I want you to try to stop the Jananaweed from killing the farmers. Do not send them money, food or water if they don’t stop.
    Work with the U. N to stop the killing. Try to help them and maybe bring the orphans here to good families.

    Sincerely,
    Giovanni

    May 1, 2007 at 10:51 am

  3. KEVIN F.

    I LIKE THE FILM BECAUSE MS.DEMO CLASS WAS THE BEST ABOUT HURRICANE KATRINA I LIKE BECAUSE MANY PEOPLE DIED IN THE HURRICANE KATRINA . I LIKED LEARNIGN ABOUT HURRICANES AND MAKNG THE FILM. I LIKE FIRE SAFETY FILM BY MANNY. I LEARNED THINGS ON HOW TO BE SAFE IN A FIRE.

    June 11, 2007 at 9:24 am

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