January Writing Contests: Deadline 1/25/08

This month in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s birthday we are accepting written pieces on three people:

1. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr

.martin-luther-king2.jpg

Research Dr. King’s life and write a piece about him.
Your piece should include all/some of the following points:

* Where and When Martin Luther King grew up, what was the world like he grew up in (the segregated south)
* What strengths Martin possessed in himself (what type of a man was he?)
* What kind of a family did Martin come from?
* How was the Church important to Martin and how did it help him accomplish the great things he did.
* What were some of Martin Accomplishments?
* What did Martin Change in The United States?
* How important was Martin to ending racism in our country?
* Do you think we still have problems with racism in our country?
• If you answer yes to this how can we change it?

2. Rosa Parks and the history of the Montgomery Bus boycott.t012714a.jpg

• Who were Rosa parks?
• Where and when did she live?
• What were the laws on buses in the segregated south?
• What was the boycott?
• What was life like in the segregated south?
• How did the boycott change segregation?

• Give details, how long did it last?
• How did the African American Citizens travel?
• Who was the leader of the boycott?
• Talk about how this little boycott changed the law in the United states
• Why are Rosa Parks and this boycott important in our history?

2 “Ruby Bridges”

problem_lg.jpg
Write a short review of this movie.

* Tell what the story was about. (What happened in the story? {Plot}

* When and where did the story take place? (Setting)
* Tell what you find important about Ruby’s story?
* What does it mean that schools were segregated?
* At the time how did the white citizens feel about integration (African American and white students attending schools together)?

• How did Ruby’s African American neighbors feel about Ruby attending a white school?
* What was life like for African Americans at the time (1960) in the south?
* What was special about Ruby?
• What was special about her family?
* What do you think got her through her trouble?
• How would have you reacted if you were she?
• Would you have been afraid or angry?

17 responses

  1. Martin Luther King, Jr. (January 15, 1929–April 4, 1968), was one of the main leaders of the American civil rights movement. A Baptist minister by training, King became a civil rights activist early in his career, leading the Montgomery Bus Boycott and helping to found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. His efforts led to the 1963 March on Washington, where King delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech, raising public consciousness of the civil rights movement and establishing King as one of the greatest orators in American history. In 1964, King became the youngest person to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts to end segregation and racial discrimination through civil disobedience and other non-violent means.

    King was assassinated on April 4, 1968, in Memphis, Tennessee. He was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Jimmy Carter in 1977. Martin Luther King Day was established as a national holiday in the United States in 1986. In 2004, King was posthumously awarded a Congressional Gold Medal.He was only 39 when he passed.

    January 15, 2008 at 6:43 pm

  2. On December 1, 1955, Parks became famous for refusing to obey bus driver James Blake’s order that she give up her seat to make room for a white passenger. This action of civil disobedience started the Montgomery Bus Boycott, which is one of the largest movements against racial segregation. In addition, this launched Martin Luther King, Jr., who was involved with the boycott, to prominence in the civil rights movement. She has had a lasting legacy worldwide.

    January 15, 2008 at 6:44 pm

  3. In spring 1960, Bridges was one of several black kindergarteners in the New Orleans to take a test to determine which children would be the first to attend integrated schools. Six students were chosen; of these six, two decided to stay in their old schools, three were assigned to McDonogh Elementary, and only Bridges was assigned to Frantz. Her father initially was reluctant, but her mother felt strongly that the move was needed not only to give her own daughter a better education, but to “take this step forward … for all black children.”[1]

    The court-ordered first day of integrated schools in New Orleans, November 14, 1960, was commemorated by Norman Rockwell in a painting called The Problem We All Live With. Due to white opposition to integration, Bridges needed protection to enter the school, and as local and state officials were unwilling to provide it, she was accompanied by federal marshals. Her mother had warned her that there “might be a lot of people outside this new school,” but other than that she had no warning of the crowds of screaming racists she had to pass through to enter the school.[2] As she describes it, “Driving up I could see the crowd, but living in New Orleans, I actually thought it was Mardi Gras. There was a large crowd of people outside of the school. They were throwing things and shouting, and that sort of goes on in New Orleans at Mardi Gras.”[citation needed] Former marshal Charles Burks later recalled, “She showed a lot of courage. She never cried. She didn’t whimper. She just marched along like a little soldier, and we’re all very proud of her.”[3]

    As soon as Bridges got into the school, white parents went in and brought their own children out; all but one of the white teachers also refused to teach while a black child was enrolled. Only Barbara Henry, from Boston, Massachusetts, was willing to teach Bridges, and for over a year Mrs. Henry taught her alone, “as if she were teaching a whole class.” That first day, Bridges and her adult companions spent the entire day in the principal’s office; the chaos of the school prevented their moving to the classroom until the second day. Every morning, as Bridges walked to school, one woman would threaten to poison her;[4] therefore the child only wanted to eat pre-packaged food. Another woman at the school put a black baby doll in a wooden coffin and protested with it outside the school, a sight that Bridges Hall has said “scared me more than the nasty things people screamed at us.” At her mother’s suggestion, Bridges began to pray on the way to school, which she found provided “protection” from the disgusting, hurtful comments yelled at her on the daily walks.[5]

    Child psychiatrist Robert Coles volunteered to provide counseling to Bridges during her first year at Frantz. He met with her weekly in the Bridges home, later writing a children’s book, The Story of Ruby Bridges, to acquaint other children with Bridges’ story.

    The Bridges family suffered for their decision to send her to William Frantz Elementary: her father lost his job, and her grandparents, who were sharecroppers in Mississippi, were turned off their land. However, she has noted that many others in the community — both black and white — showed support in a variety of ways. Some white families continued to send their children to Frantz despite the protests, a neighbor provided her father with a new job, and local people babysat, watched the house as protectors, and walked behind the federal marshals’ car on the trips to school.[2][6] Barbara Henry also suffered for her stand, as she was not invited to return to the school at the end of the year, eventually returning to her native Boston.

    [edit] Adult life
    Ruby Bridges, now Ruby Bridges Hall, still lives in New Orleans. For 15 years she worked as a travel agent, later becoming a full-time parent to her four sons. She is now chair of the Ruby Bridges Foundation, which she formed in 1999 to promote “the values of tolerance, respect, and appreciation of all differences”. Describing the mission of the group, she says, “racism is a grown-up disease and we must stop using our children to spread it.”[7]

    In 1993 Bridges Hall began looking after her recently orphaned nieces, then attending William Frantz Elementary as their aunt had before them. She began to volunteer as a parent liaison three days a week. Eventually, publicity related to Coles’ children’s book caused reporters to track down Bridges Hall and write stories about her volunteer work at the school, which in turn led to a reunion with teacher Henry. Henry and Bridges Hall now sometimes make joint appearances in schools in connection with the Bridges Foundation.[8]

    On January 28, 2001, Bridges was a recipient of the Presidential Citizens Medal.

    On October 27, 2006, the city of Alameda, California dedicated a new elementary school to Ruby Bridges, and issued a proclamation in her honor.

    In November 2006 she was honored in the Anti-Defamation League’s Concert Against Hate.

    In 2007 the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis unveiled a new exhibit documenting Bridges’ life, along with the lives of Anne Frank and Ryan White.

    Bridges is the subject of the Lori McKenna song “Ruby’s Shoes.”

    January 15, 2008 at 6:45 pm

  4. MICHAEL KING JR. WAS BORN ON JANUARY 15,1929,IN THE ATLANTA HOME OF HIS MATERNAL GRANDFATHER,ADAM DANIEL WILLIAMS.THE SOUTH WAS HORRIBLE AT THAT TIME BECAUSE BLACKS AND WHITES COULD NOT DRINK FROM THE SAME WATER THEY COULD NOT EAT TOGETHER IT WAS JUST HORRIBLE,IT WAS SEGREGATED BLACK PEOPLE COULD NOT DO ANTTHING BUT THE WHITES COULD DO ALOT THEY HAD ALL THE PRIVELEGES.WELL FOR SURE WE CAN SAY HE’S A FARE MAN MARTIN HE ALSO WAS A MINNSTER AND A GREAT SPEEKER.HE CHANGED EVEN THE LAW AND THE AT THAT TIME IS IN THE SUOTH BLACKS COULD NOT HAVE SERTIN THINGS LIKE GOOD WATER GOOD FOOD GOOD SEATS ON A BUS AND OTHERS, DO YOU KNOW HE WAS A GREAT ASSET TO THE U.S.WE TODAY CAN MAKE A CHANGE BY STANDING UP FOR OUR RIGHTS WHEN SOMEONE GOES AGAINST YOU.

    THANK THE LORD FOR MARTIN!

    January 16, 2008 at 1:20 pm

  5. # macblog06 January 16, 2008 at 12:53 pm

    MLK JR was a good man. MLK JR was born in 1929 JAN.19. his dad was a ministen.
    segregation means-the action or state of setting someone or something apart from other people or things or being set apart. people’s civil rights mean-the rights of citizens to political and social freedom and equality.Martin feels bad when
    the mom of martin friends did’t let them play with him.Martin dont feels equal
    with the white people.What roll did the church play in Martin’s self-esteem?
    a ministen.
    # 13 macblog06 January 16, 2008 at 12:55 pm

    MLK JR was a good man. MLK JR was born in 1929 JAN.19. his dad was a ministen.
    segregation means-the action or state of setting someone or something apart from other people or things or being set apart. people’s civil rights mean-the rights of citizens to political and social freedom and equality.Martin feels bad when
    the mom of martin friends did’t let them play with him.Martin dont feels equal
    with the white people.What roll did the church play in Martin’s self-esteem?
    a ministen.2
    # 14 kevin January 16, 2008 at 1:03 pm

    Martin was born in 1929 his birthday was in january 15 .martin was a good man .martin had 1 brother .martin was the first man to discover civil right.martin lived in atlanta,georgia.back than southern it was hard . back than black and white could not and did not go to the same bathroom ,and the water foundation. back in the south there was no seperared and segerated .
    # 15 macblog06 January 16, 2008 at 1:19 pm

    MLK JR was a good man. MLK JR was born in 1929 JAN.19. his dad was a ministen.
    segregation means-the action or state of setting someone or something apart from other people or things or being set apart. people’s civil rights mean-the rights of citizens to political and social freedom and equality.Martin feels bad when
    the mom of martin friends did’t let them play with him.Martin dont feels equal
    with the white people.What roll did the church play in Martin’s self-esteem?
    a ministen. What was life like in the Southern States in the U. S. when Martin was a boy 1929-1935? the colors and the non-colors fight the colors. all of
    things ware segregat.
    # 16 macblog06 January 16, 2008 at 2:40 pm

    Vincent Martino
    Martin Luther king JR WAS A BLACK MAN FULL Of love and care he thought that it was not right to judge people by the color of their skin color
    he said that that I HAVE A DREAM THAT THE BLACKS AND WHITES COME TO GATHER he was not going to rest until this was over. It is better to day when black people and white people can do every thing to gether back in martins days there was racem and segaration the blacks were not treated fairly at all he wanted blacks and whits to have equal rights.when martin was a kid he loved base ball but coulden’t play with his white peers.wites were taught not to play with the colored.Martins father was a minister.Martin did not just help the black he helped plenty white people to he was a man of fath.he got married and had a son and a daughter.Martin went to collage at the age of 15 it was not his moms choice he made his own good desisons he was smart he did not belive in racem.Martin has a older sister.Martin wrote alot of good poems like darkness can not drive out of darkness.

    January 16, 2008 at 3:26 pm

  6. Devonte Thomas

    A long time ago. before I was born, there were 3 african american people who wanted the same things. They all wanted to change the laws. The law said brown people and white people could not go to the same places. Martin Luther King Jr. and Rosa Parks and Ruby Bridges wanted all people to play together.
    Rosa Parks was sitting on the bus. A white guy said
    get up. She said no. The law said she had to get up.
    She broke the law. She went to jail. Other brown people were angry
    about this so they stopped using the bus. This is called boycotting.
    Ruby Bridges was the first brown kid to go to a white school. She had to take a test to go so the white people made it hard so all the black people would quit. She passed the test but white people were angry so they did not go to school.
    Martin Luther King Jr. wanted his kids to be safe. He spoke to all the people to change laws. He didnt fight or kick. He used his words. Someone killed him because they were afraid that all the people would start to listen. Not everyone wanted the laws to change.
    President Kennedy fought to change the law and he was killed. President Johnson was finally able to change the law. The Civil Rights Act in 1964 made it so brown people and white people can stay together in every place even the playground and schools. Today, everyone is still in school and the playground together. We all play nicely together.

    Devonte, Class X04

    January 23, 2008 at 3:35 pm

  7. Channelle J.

    Rosa Parks
    Rosa parks was in jail, it was in Montgomery Alabama. In this time black people had to sit in the back of the bus. In the south their was separation of black and white people and it was legal. Many places black and white people were not allowed to be together.

    On December 1st, 1955 this is what happened. Rosa got on the bus and sat down, she was asked to give up her seat to a white person. She was arrested. She did not follow the rules because it was not a good rule.
    Then they had the boycott and changed the law. Soon they would not be separate.

    January 28, 2008 at 11:38 am

  8. It all started with Rosa by Prince
    Rosa met Martin Luther King jr. and they decided to change the law.
    They had a plan. The plan was no black person would ride the bus. That is just what they did It worked the bad rule that said that black people had to sit on the back of the buses was stopped.
    Then other people started to so the right thing.Soon all the rules began to change.
    But it alls started with Rosa, she met Martin and they changed things.

    January 28, 2008 at 11:44 am

  9. Malakhi

    Martin Luther King Jr was one of the main leaders of the American civil rights movement. A Baptist minister by training, King became a civil rights activist early in career leading the Montgomery Bus Boycott and helping to found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. His efforts led to the 1963 March on Washington where King delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech, raising public consciousness of the civil rights movement and establishing King as one of the greatest orators in American history. In 1964 Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts to end segregation and racial discrimination through civil disobedience and other non-violent means.
    King was assassinated on April 4, 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee. He was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Jimmy Carter in 1977. Martin Luther King Jr was established as a national holiday in the United States in 1986. In 2004, King was posthumously awarded a Congressional Gold Medal.

    Questions
    1. Martin grew up in Atlanta Georgia USA. When January 15, 1929. He was living in a different world than us but new freedom change it. It was a lot of segregation down in the south. you could not be near a white person if your black and touch each other or drink out the same water fountain. And back the city bus you have to sit in back if your black. If your white, you sit in the front.

    2. Martin was a strange black men and change the United States. He also changed freedom. If it wasn’t for Martin Luther King, it would be a different world.

    3. Martin was born on 1/15/29 in AG. He was the son of Reverend Martin Luther King Sr and Alberta Williams King. Although Dr. King’s name was mistakenly recorded as “Michael King” on his birth certificate, this was not discovered until 1934 when his father applied for a passport. He had an older sister, Willie Christine (September 11, 1927) and a younger brother, Alfred Daniel (July 30, 1930)- (July 1st, 1969). King sang with his church choir at the 1939 Atlanta premiere of the movie “Gone with the Wind”. He entered Morehouse College at age fifteen skipping his ninth and twelfth high school grade without formally graduating. In 1948, he graduated from Morehouse with a bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree in sociology and enrolled in Crozer Theological seminary in Chester Pennsylvania and graduated with a Bachelor of Divinity (B.D.) degree in 1951. In September 1951, King began doctoral studies in systematic theology at Boston university and received his Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) on June.

    Martin Luther King played baseball in his neighborhood he was the best player. In his neighborhood he played with white peers. He had a wife named Correta Scott King and a daughter named Yolanda. They tried to bomb up his house. But his wife and daughter was okay. His dad was a minister. He had a dream it was a famous speech in 1963. It wa sin Washington, D.C. Marting skipped 9th and 12th grade and went to college at the age of 15.

    January 29, 2008 at 11:42 am

  10. Malakhi

    Ruby Bridges

    Ruby Bridges was born in Tyler Mississippi in 1954 just one year before the famous Montgomery Bus boycott.
    Segregation was slowly coming to an end. Ruby moved to New Orleans with her parents and when she was 6 years old she was chosen to go to an all white school. The first one in the state. The NAACP wanted her to participate in integrating the schools of New Orleans.
    In September 1960 Ruby was one of 6 Kindergartners that went to white schools. They took a test to see who would go. She was smart so she went to the Franz Elememtery school.
    Her father did not want her to go but her mother said give here a chance to get a better education.

    It was very rough. No one wanted Ruby there. People would protest outside the school screaming at her. None of the white children came to school. Everyday the people would protest some threatened to kill her.
    Ruby was brave, it was so bad soldiers had to take her to school and her father lost his job.
    Ruby just kept being brave and eventually all the white kids came back to school. Things changed and schools would one day be integrated. It all started with Ruby.

    January 31, 2008 at 5:28 pm

  11. Martin L. King by Danny Korenski

    Martin Grew up in Atlanta Georgia. He was born January 15th 1929. He grew up in Segregation. He had to stand up and give up his seat to a white guy.
    Segregation was really bad. Even though Martin came from a pretty rich family he had it hard and was treated badly because he was black.

    Segregation made him feel angry and mad as a kid. He did not want his kids to grow up like that. So he tried to change things. The Church taught him to love himself, believe in himself and to love others.
    He changed the world his own way.

    February 4, 2008 at 9:24 am

  12. Jonathan V.

    Ruby Bridges

    I would be mad about the racist people if I were Ruby. Just 6 years old and having all those people protesting integration, screaming at you
    Ruby she just kept on going to school though I would be really mad and scared.

    They even tried to poison her food, or at least threatened to. I would do the same as Ruby eat only packaged food.

    I would have felt about the US Marshals taking me to school and keeping me safe.

    February 4, 2008 at 9:30 am

  13. Ruby Bridges

    If I was Ruby Bridges by Justin F.

    If I was Ruby in 1960 I would feel sad because of what other people were doing to me. The people who were protesting outside her school because they did not want a black girl in school did terrible things.

    One person showed her a casket with a black doll in it that was supposed to be her and they spit on her. They also told her they were going to poison her food. She was brave because she went to school by herself.

    February 4, 2008 at 9:33 am

  14. If I was Ruby by D.Franks
    If I was Ruby Bridges I would feel angry because all those people were yelling and shouting. I wouldn’t do or say anything to them. I would just keep on walking. I would wear ear plugs so I could not hear them. I would be brave when I needed to and wouldn’t pay them any mind.

    February 4, 2008 at 9:36 am

  15. Erik Espinal

    She is a black child that made black and white come together. What made her different from the other kids at school was that she was black. Segregation meant seperate schools.

    If I were here I would feel sad with everyone screaming at me when I tried to go to school. I would try to do the same just like Ruby and just keep walking. She helped us all so we can be in the same school together.

    February 4, 2008 at 9:48 am

  16. MLK by Jon. HartMartin Luther King Man was a a good man. He desegregated most of the world. During his child hood he had lots of friends, one white one. When he was little they played together everyday. One day when Martin got to his friends house his mother said “we are white you are a negro and you can’t play with my son anymore.

    This was his introduction to racism. Martin felt sad because he was taught he was equal to everyone. This made him think he should change the law.
    When he got older he got good grades past college and became a pastor.

    In 1963 Martin made a huge speech. He said ” I have a dream that one day black and white children will play together”
    His dream was desegragation. He wanted everyone to love one another and become friends.

    Martin changed the whole world we his work. If not for him perhaps black people would still be treated terribly. Maybe Rosa parks would have never gotten justice.
    These are the reason I always look up to him, even though he is in heaven.

    February 4, 2008 at 9:57 am

  17. While doing research on Terri Dickerson, Director of Civil Rights who lists integrating private schools in Baltimore in 1962 on bio, we came across a Real Hero of Integration; Ruby Bridges. Ruby did what Ms. Dickerson purported to have done as a courageous act, two years before Dickerson’s biographical act. That’s not the reason for this comment; the reason is our children need to learn about Ruby Bridges, and what she did for our nation as a six year old.

    February 24, 2008 at 5:57 am

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