Archive for October, 2008

Kent T’s Election Rap.

kent-tucker-on-the-election

click to listen


The Annual Halloween Story Contest

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Halloween Story Contest.

Deadline is October 24th, 2008. All stories should be blogged on this link.

Rules

1. Story should be original

2. Story Can be any genre you choose, scary, funny, realistic, fantasy, etc…

3. Poems are Welcome.

Stories will be judged in 4 categories and prizes will be awarded to:

  1. Most Original Story

  2. Best Written Story

  3. Scariest Story

  4. Funniest Story.

A separate award will be given for poems.

What wins this contest is good writing. An original story, clear and interesting characters, and good descriptive writing .

All entries receive a prize in addition to the prize categories.

The winners and the best of the bunch will be podcast here.

Good luck.

Ms. B.


Announcing our “Mock Election” Blog

Here it is our Mock Election blog. We have it all, links to great website swhere you can learn about the election, writing contests and a voting booth that works, Well not yet we are having some trouble with our voting booth. So far P.S. 25 has committed to participate and we are going to try to get some other Staten Island Schools to join us. Here is the Address http://mockelection2008.wordpress.com/ or click on the picture to go directly there


The Electoral College: How does it work?

What is the Electoral College?

The Electoral College, administered by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), is not a place, it is a process that began as part of the original design of the U.S. Constitution. The Electoral College was established by the founding fathers as a compromise between election of the president by Congress and election by popular vote. The people of the United States vote for the electors who then vote for the President. Read more about how the terms “Elector” and “Electoral College” came into usage.

How Many Votes do States Get?

Each State is allocated a number of electors equal to the number of its U.S. Senators (always 2) plus the number of its U.S. Representatives. The number of electors for a State is based on the number of members in the House of Representatives who represent the State, plus two for the State’s Senators. A State’s Congressional delegation is determined by the State’s population.

The number of people in each State is determined by the Federal census, which is taken every ten years and includes a count of every State’s population.

Number of electoral votes needed to win

270. In the early days of the United States, this number periodically increase as the number of states and population grew (e.g. George Washington won his first election in 1789 with a unanimous 69 electoral votes). The number of electoral college members is set by the number of US House Representatives (set at 435 seats since 1911), the number of US Senators (2 per state = 100), plus 3 votes for Washington DC. The total size of the electoral college is thus 538. To achieve victory in the presidential election, a candidate must win half of the electoral college (269) plus one vote, else the election is decided by the incoming House of Representatives. In this case, each state is allotted one vote, and the House must then choose the president among the top three candidates recipients of electoral votes

Who Selects the Electors?

The process for selecting electors varies throughout the United States. Generally, the political parties nominate electors at their State party conventions or by a vote of the party’s central committee in each State.

Electors are often selected to recognize their service and dedication to their political party. They may be State-elected officials, party leaders, or persons who have a personal or political affiliation with the Presidential candidate.

Then the voters in each State choose the electors on the day of the general election. The electors’ names may or may not appear on the ballot below the name of the candidates running for President, depending on the procedure in each State.

Frequently Asked Questions


How did the terms “Elector” and “Electoral College” come into usage?

The term “electoral college” does not appear in the Constitution. Article II of the Constitution and the 12th Amendment refer to “electors,” but not to the “electoral college.” In the Federalist Papers (No. 68), Alexander Hamilton refers to the process of selecting the Executive, and refers to “the people of each State (who) shall choose a number of persons as electors,” but he does not use the term “electoral college.”

The founders appropriated the concept of electors from the Holy Roman Empire (962 – 1806). An elector was one of a number of princes of the various German states within the Holy Roman Empire who had a right to participate in the election of the German king (who generally was crowned as emperor). The term “college” (from the Latin collegium), refers to a body of persons that act as a unit, as in the college of cardinals who advise the Pope and vote in papal elections. In the early 1800’s, the term “electoral college” came into general usage as the unofficial designation for the group of citizens selected to cast votes for President and Vice President. It was first written into Federal law in 1845, and today the term appears in 3 U.S.C. section 4, in the section heading and in the text as “college of electors.”


Who selects the Electors?

The process for selecting electors varies throughout the United States. Generally, the political parties nominate electors at their State party conventions or by a vote of the party’s central committee in each State. Electors are often selected to recognize their service and dedication to their political party. They may be State elected officials, party leaders, or persons who have a personal or political affiliation with the Presidential candidate. Then the voters in each State choose the electors on the day of the general election. The electors’ names may or may not appear on the ballot below the name of the candidates running for President, depending on the procedure in each State.


What are the qualifications to be an elector?

The U.S. Constitution contains very few provisions relating to the qualifications of electors. Article II, section 1, clause 2 provides that no Senator or Representative, or Person holding an Office of Trust or Profit under the United States, shall be appointed an Elector. As a historical matter, the 14th Amendment provides that State officials who have engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the United States or given aid and comfort to its enemies are disqualified from serving as electors. This prohibition relates to the post-Civil War era.