Archive for January, 2009

And the Winner is….

I am not going to tell you….You have to watch the screencast to find out! What is a screen cast? Well it is a movie made of your desk top with a great piece of free software called Jing.

Jing makes a movie of your whole desktop and records your voice, really great for demonstrations and teaching. click here to see which mascot got the most VOTES

If you like you can download Jing and start making screencasts of your own! Download Jing here!

Here is a list of the students who participated in Picking the Choices for  mascot

From Class V-03  (Banerjee) at Petrides, all meerkats:
Steven     Anthony    Freddy    Jason    Jessica    Jeanmarie
William    Christian    Chazz    Antonio    Michael

Class X-12 (Larson) at Petrides:
Jake – giraffe    Justin – dinosaur    Chloe – tiger
Caleb – duck    Michael – jaguar    Brandon – lion

Miss Bates’ class:
Anthony

Class V – 44 (Cunningham) Main Bldg:
James – parrot    Nikolas – dog        Besim – dragon    Javon – german shepherd
Robert – tiger      Dwayne – jaguar    Ryan – pit bull      Zihir  – bear

Class V – 45 (Dickerson)Main Bldg:
Frank    Annor

Class V-47 (Brassfield) Main Bldg:
Shawnna – wildcat    Tyheem – cheetah    Andrew – lion        Jacob – tiger
angel – chipmunk    Hasaan – polar bear    Essence – eagle    Eliezer – elephant

Class X – 03 (Roche) Main Bldg:
Billy – wolf    Andrew – lion    Oche

Class X-05 (Knudson) Main Bldg:
Blair – panther    Jonathan – eagle

Class Y-05 (Raiola) Mini Bldg:
Noemi – Little Miss Sunshine

Ms. Cordero, Mini Building:
Tyler – puppy    Michael Y – turtle    Ana – dalmation    Elijah – horse    Davonte – horse

Ms. Corvino, Mini Building:
Anthony – cheetah    Angel – cheetah    Katrel – poodle    Diante – wolf
Lance – fire-breathing dragon

Class Y-01, Mini Building:
Luis – panda    Shawn – gorilla    Veronica – tiger    Jose – cheetah    Zanasia – butterfly


Gandhi Assassinated: Jan 31st 1948

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, the political and spiritual leader of the Indian independence movement, is assassinated in New Delhi by a Hindu fanatic.

Born the son of an Indian official in 1869, Gandhi’s Vaishnava mother was deeply religious and early on exposed her son to Jainism, a morally rigorous Indian religion that advocated nonviolence. Gandhi was an unremarkable student but in 1888 was given an opportunity to study law in England. In 1891, he returned to India, but failing to find regular legal work he accepted in 1893 a one-year contract in South Africa.

Settling in Natal, he was subjected to racism and South African laws that restricted the rights of Indian laborers. Gandhi later recalled one such incident, in which he was removed from a first-class railway compartment and thrown off a train, as his moment of truth. From thereon, he decided to fight injustice and defend his rights as an Indian and a man. When his contract expired, he spontaneously decided to remain in South Africa and launched a campaign against legislation that would deprive Indians of the right to vote. He formed the Natal Indian Congress and drew international attention to the plight of Indians in South Africa. In 1906, the Transvaal government sought to further restrict the rights of Indians, and Gandhi organized his first campaign of satyagraha, or mass civil disobedience. After seven years of protest, he negotiated a compromise agreement with the South African government.

In 1914, Gandhi returned to India and lived a life of abstinence and spirituality on the periphery of Indian politics. He supported Britain in the First World War but in 1919 launched a new satyagraha in protest of Britain’s mandatory military draft of Indians. Hundreds of thousands answered his call to protest, and by 1920 he was leader of the Indian movement for independence. He reorganized the Indian National Congress as a political force and launched a massive boycott of British goods, services, and institutions in India. Then, in 1922, he abruptly called off the satyagraha when violence erupted. One month later, he was arrested by the British authorities for sedition, found guilty, and imprisoned.

After his release in 1924, he led an extended fast in protest of Hindu-Muslim violence. In 1928, he returned to national politics when he demanded dominion status for India and in 1930 launched a mass protest against the British salt tax, which hurt India’s poor. In his most famous campaign of civil disobedience, Gandhi and his followers marched to the Arabian Sea, where they made their own salt by evaporating sea water. The march, which resulted in the arrest of Gandhi and 60,000 others, earned new international respect and support for the leader and his movement.

In 1931, Gandhi was released to attend the Round Table Conference on India in London as the sole representative of the Indian National Congress. The meeting was a great disappointment, and after his return to India he was again imprisoned. While in jail, he led another fast in protest of the British government’s treatment of the “untouchables”–the impoverished and degraded Indians who occupied the lowest tiers of the caste system. In 1934, he left the Indian Congress Party to work for the economic development of India’s many poor. His protege, Jawaharlal Nehru, was named leader of the party in his place.

With the outbreak of World War II, Gandhi returned to politics and called for Indian cooperation with the British war effort in exchange for independence. Britain refused and sought to divide India by supporting conservative Hindu and Muslim groups. In response, Gandhi launched the “Quit India” movement it 1942, which called for a total British withdrawal. Gandhi and other nationalist leaders were imprisoned until 1944.

In 1945, a new government came to power in Britain, and negotiations for India’s independence began. Gandhi sought a unified India, but the Muslim League, which had grown in influence during the war, disagreed. After protracted talks, Britain agreed to create the two new independent states of India and Pakistan on August 15, 1947. Gandhi was greatly distressed by the partition, and bloody violence soon broke out between Hindus and Muslims in India.

In an effort to end India’s religious strife, he resorted to fasts and visits to the troubled areas. He was on one such vigil in New Delhi when Nathuram Godse, a Hindu extremist who objected to Gandhi’s tolerance for the Muslims, fatally shot him. Known as Mahatma, or “the great soul,” during his lifetime, Gandhi’s persuasive methods of civil disobedience influenced leaders of civil rights movements around the world, especially Martin Luther King Jr. in the United States.


Write A letter to Our President!

We are sponsoring a letter writing contest to our new president Barack Obama.

Click here to watch screencast of this post Click Here

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Write a letter to Barack Obama! We will be doing a mass mailing on Feb 12 to our president. If you would like to be included please bring all completed letters to Ms. Broderick in room 311 not later than February 11th . Here is a template from TFK that can help you plan your letters click here 081107_wr_1

Prizes will be given to the best letters. They can be neatly handwritten or type written. They must follow the basic letter writing format see my screencast on the basic format for a business letter by clicking here.

Here is another link that can help you with your format in writing letters.

http://jc-schools.net/write/letter-write.htm

Also below is a rubric you can follow for writing a letter.

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Vote for P.S.373R’s Mascot!

Here is our Mascot Poll. Below are descriptions written by children of the animals that were submittedand pictures of the animal. Once we choose an animal we will have a drawing contest for that animal. Vote for your favorite. Each student and staff member should vote only once. We will run the contest from today until next Friday January 30th, to give everyone a chance to vote.


Barack Obama by the Numbers

This is a number poem that Yousef Faraj created on Jan. 20th,the day of Barack Obama’s inaugaration.

0 – HOW LONG WE HAVE TO WAIT FOR A MINORITY PRESIDENT

1. (FIRST) THE NATIONS FIRST BLACK PRESIDENT

2. THE SECOND TIME A PRESIDENT HAS BEEN SWORN IN ON PRESIDENT LINCOLN’S BIBLE

3. 3 MILLION PEOPLE EXPECTED FOR TODAY’S INAUGURATION.

4. THE AMOUNT OF YEARS OBAMA WILL SERVE AS PRESIDENT

7 PRESIDENT OBAMA’S DAUGHTER SASHA IS 7

10 PRESIDENT OBAMA’S older  DAUGHTERS AGE 10

12 . 12 NOON OBAMA TAKES THE OATH OF OFFICE USING PRESIDENT LINCOLN’S BIBLE

17. THE LENGTH OF MINUTES OF BARACK OBAMA’S SPEECH

31. THE TEMPERATURE AT 12 NOON IN WASHINGTON D.C. FOR THE INAUGARATION

44. HOW MANY PRESIDENTS OUR COUNTRY HAS HAD

45 THE AGE OF MICHELLE OBAMA

47 THE AGE OF BARACK OBAMA

50 THE STATE OF HAWAII WAS OUR COUNTRIES 50TH STATE, AND ONE TIME RESIDENCE OF BARACK OBAMA

56 THE NUMBER OF INAUGURATIONS OUR COUNTRY HAS HAD.

80 HOW OLD MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. WOULD HAVE BEEN AT TODAY’S INAUGURATION

105 MINUTES THE LONGEST INAUGURATION SPEECH FOR A PRESIDENT, WILLIAM H. HARRISON

136 WORDS IN PRESIDENT WASHINGTON’S INAUGURATION SPEECH THE SHORTEST ON RECORD.

200 HOW OLD PRESIDENT LINCOLN WOULD HAVE BEEN AT TODAY’S INAUGURATION

1982 THE year PRESIDENT OBAMA LOST HIS DAD.

1983 THE YEAR PRESIDENT OBAMA GRADUATED FROM COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

1995 THE YEAR PRESIDENT OBAMA LOST HIS MOM

303,824,640 PEOPLE, UNITED AMERICANS BELIEVING IN ONE GOAL.


The 44th President of the United States, and What Can I do to help, Mr. President?

Click on the link to watch Barack Obama being sworn in as the 44th President of the United States.
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Yesterday was a great day for our nation yes because we elected an African-American man who as he put it “60 years ago my father would had a hard time being served at restaurants in this area (Washington, D.C.) and today in that same place his son became President of the United States “. Yes that is a victory, but that is not enough. President Obama promises to serve us and he asks for our help in making America a better country. He says it starts with communities and Neighborhoods. He says that each person, adult and child must answer his call to make this a better country. He calls all of us to service. So I ask you what can you do to make your home, your school, your neighborhood a better place? What steps can you take to make the world better for everyone?
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This is very much in the spirit of Gandhi and King two men we have been discussing these last weeks.Two men who always asked themselves the question; What can I do to help?
Lets talk about this today and each pledge something we can do to make our world a better place to live in.

Happy Birthday Dr. King:

martin_luther_king_pointing_finger Tuesday is an important day in our countries future. On Tuesday, January 20th  2008 Barack Obama becomes President in a country where less than 50 years ago it would have been hard for him to vote in many parts of this country because he is an  African American. Historical to say the least.

Today is an important anniversary in our countries past and yes future. Today is Dr. Martin Luther King’s Birthday.  He would be 80 years old if he had not been gunned down at the  young age of 39. That is right he changed the world he lived in for the better before he was forty.   A man who started a movement that insured that Barack Obama and millions like him would be guaranteed their right to vote , and all of the other civil rights that we Americans are promised in the United States Constitution.

Some of my older classes have been looking at Mahatma Gandhi this week. Gandhi led a peaceful protest against the racism and discrimination of Indians in their own nation by the English. He used non-violent protest like King to change laws and gain freedom.  Indeed he did it first. King learned from Gandhi about the principles of non-violence and love as weapons to fight injustice and racism.  King learned that violence would not change things, he saw that peaceful protest was the only way to really change things. And things have changed. I was very young when King was murdered, I remember. I am old enough to see the changes  in our world.  I owe as does Barack Obama a debt of thanks to King and the thousands of people who fought  peacefully for  equality for all people.

One thing that Gandhi said that really applies to King ” Be the change you want to see in the World” King was the change he wanted to see. He gave up his life, working for  years to make this world better for all. King was the change he wanted to see in the world, was an example of love and peace.

Yes Tuesday is an important day, celebrate it, enjoy it and remember it. After a  past that included slavery and segregation we have an African American President, but lets not forget how important today, January 15th  is as well.

Happy Birthday Martin Luther King Jr.


This Day In History: Japanese Internment

Article From this day In History
January 14, 1942
japanese-internment
Roosevelt ushers in Japanese-American internment
On this day in 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt issues Presidential Proclamation No. 2537, requiring aliens from World War II-enemy countries–Italy, Germany and Japan–to register with the United States Department of Justice. Registered persons were then issued a “Certificate of Identification for Aliens of Enemy Nationality.” A follow-up to the Alien Registration Act of 1940, Proclamation No. 2537 facilitated the beginning of full-scale internment of Japanese Americans the following month.
While most Americans expected the U.S. to enter the war, presumably in Europe or the Philippines, the nation was shocked to hear of Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. In the wake of the bombing, the West Coast appeared particularly vulnerable to another Japanese military offensive. A large population of Japanese Americans inhabited the western states and American military analysts feared some would conduct acts of sabotage on west-coast defense and agricultural industries.
Official relations between the governments of Japan and the United States had soured in the 1930s when Japan began its military conquest of Chinese territory. China, weakened by a civil war between nationalists and communists, represented an important strategic relationship for both the U.S. and Japan. Japan desperately needed China’s raw materials in order to continue its program of modernization. The U.S. needed a democratic Chinese government to counter both Japanese military expansion in the Pacific and the spread of communism in Asia. Liberal Japanese resented American anti-Japanese policies, particularly in California, where exclusionary laws were passed to prevent Japanese Americans from competing with U.S. citizens in the agricultural industry. In spite of these tensions, a 1941 federal report requested by Roosevelt indicated that more than 90 percent of Japanese Americans were considered loyal citizens. Nevertheless, under increasing pressure from agricultural associations, military advisors and influential California politicians, Roosevelt agreed to begin the necessary steps for possible internment of the Japanese-American population.
Ostensibly issued in the interest of national security, Proclamation No. 2537 permitted the “arrest, detention and internment” of enemy aliens who violated restricted areas, such as ports, water treatment plants or even areas prone to brush fires, “for the duration of the war.” A month later, a reluctant but resigned Roosevelt signed the War Department’s blanket Executive Order 9066, which authorized the physical removal of all Japanese Americans into internment camps.

King On Peace

Click on the Photo of King to Listen to a Podcast of this Post.

peacehands-1.jpgON PEACE (1964): “Sooner or later all the people of the world will have to discover a way to live together in peace and thereby transform this pending cosmic elegy into a creative psalm of brotherhood. I refuse to accept the view that mankind is so tragically bound to the starless midnight of racism and war that the bright daybreak of peace and brotherhood can never become a reality. This is why right temporarily defeated is stronger than evil triumphant.”

This a a quote from Martin Luther King on peace and he is giving his opinion if he believes peace is possible in our world.

You can look up any words you do not know by going dictionary.com, typing in the word and getting the definition.

Read and Discuss MLK’s words, what is he saying? Look at the imagery he uses to get his point across.

” starless midnight of racism and war”

bright daybreak of peace and brotherhood”,

What does he mean by this? How is racism and war like a “starless midnight?” How is peace and brotherhood like daybreak? What does he mean when he says “…right temporarily defeated is stronger than evil triumphant” ? How does this sentence relate to the civil rights movement and the long battle for equality?

What is King saying about peace? Do you agree with him or not? Do you think piece can be achieved even in the face of hatred and war? How? Why?

Best Pieces will be Podcast and win prizes!! Deadline for Pieces January 30th, 2009.

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Mahatma Gandhi: Be the Change You Want to See in the World!

One of the leaders Dr. King Studied was Indian Leader Mohandas Gandhi. He believed in nonviolent change and Said

“Be the Change You want to See in the World”mahatma_gandhi

Mohandas Gandhi was leader in the Indian nationalist movement against British rule. Many people consider him to be the father of his country, though he never held office. Gandhi is remembered for using nonviolent protest to achieve justice.

As a young man, Gandhi traveled to London to study law. He returned to India upon graduation, but was unable to find work. He accepted a job in South Africa, where many Indian people had gone to live. While on a train in South Africa, Gandhi was told to get off to make room for a European. He refused and was beaten. Gandhi considered that incident his moment of truth. He decided he would not accept injustice. He would defend his dignity as an Indian and as a man.

Gandhi decided to use his knowledge of law to help the Indian people. He spoke to groups of Indians living in South Africa about human rights. He urged them to change laws that were unfair. Once he returned to India, Gandhi took the sides of the untouchables. Gandhi called them harijans, which means “children of god.” Gandhi said that harijans had been blessed by their suffering.

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Mohandas K Gandhi (1869 – 1948)

Mahatma (“The Great Soul”) Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was born in the port city of Porbandar, in the state of Gujrat, Western India. His mother, Putlibai, was a deeply religious Hindu woman; his father, Kaba, was a very honest, conscientious civil servant. People of many religions lived in Porbandar. Many Christians, Jews, Moslems, Parsees, Sikhs and others were frequent guests in the Gandhi home. The tolerance, honesty and search for truth that Gandhi saw in his family greatly influenced him.

In 1889 Gandhi went to England to study law, and was graduated from the Inner Temple of London. While he was in England, a number of vegetarian friends who formed his support group persuaded Gandhi to study Indian religions and literature.

When he returned to India, however, he could not find a job; so he accepted an offer to go to South Africa. He was hired to serve as a lawyer to a rich Indian merchant who had settled there. While traveling in South Africa to his place of employment, Gandhi was madly mistreated by the white officials of the railway company because of his skin color. As a result of this incident, Gandhi began to think about the treatment of minorities and what could be done to improve the situation. In those days, apartheid, or racial segregation, was the law and policy of the government of South Africa. So after Gandhi settled his employer’s legal matters, he began to organize the Indian community to demand their civil rights.

During his 20 years in South Africa, Gandhi developed his principles of nonviolent resistance. He led this struggle in nonviolent confrontations with the government. The rules of nonviolent resistance that he laid down are:

  1. No hitting back (no retaliation),
  2. Endure personal pain and suffering, even death,
  3. Express love and forgiveness toward the oppressor, and
  4. Harbor no intent to harm or humiliate the oppressor, but rather a desire to settle (reconcile) differences.

After gaining many civil rights reforms, Gandhi left South Africa and returned to India in 1914. At first he traveled widely in the country to see for himself the conditions in which the poor lived, and to learn from them the ways in which he could help.

Then he began to protest the British government’s rule over India. He supported the farmers of the Champaran district in their fight against the British landlords who were their oppressors. He won a fair settlement and a good price for the farmer’s produce. He successfully mediated a labor dispute in the textile industry in the city of Ahmedabad. When the district of Bardoli refused to pay what they considered unfair taxes, Gandhi encouraged other districts to do the same in support, believing that this would overthrow the British government. However, when some of his supporters rioted and killed 22 policemen in Chauri-Chaura, Gandhi called off the rebellion. He felt personally responsible for the killings, and he did not want to kill the British to achieve peace and justice for his people. He believed that killing to get what you want was wrong, and he chose to fail, rather than achieve independence for India. He continued to stand by his principles of nonviolence, and earned the title of Mahatma – “The Great Soul.”

During the second World War, the Moslem League broke from Gandhi and demanded that India be divided into two countries – one mostly Moslem and one mostly Hindu. Since every city, town and village had mixed populations of many religions and sects, Gandhi did not agree with their position. He felt that this division would lead to war, and in 1947, when the British divided the country into India and Pakistan, his prediction came true.

During this time of civil war, Gandhi resided in the state of Bengal, in Eastern India. He brought peace to that part of the country. He then went to Delhi and accomplished the same thing there, after which he planned to move to the newly created country of Pakistan and plead for peace. But on January 30, 1948, his peaceful mission ended. He was assassinated by a fanatic he had helped free from British rule.