Posts tagged “Slavery

Frederick Douglas For Ms. Dimeo’s Class


A Short Biography of Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass-The Great Abolitionist        Frederick Douglass was born in a slave cabin, in February, 1818, near the town of Easton, on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Separated from his mother when only a few weeks old he was raised by his grandparents. At about the age of six, his grandmother took him to the plantation of his master and left him there. Not being told by her that she was going to leave him, Douglass never recovered from the betrayal of the abandonment. When he was about eight he was sent to Baltimore to live as a houseboy with Hugh and Sophia Auld, relatives of his master. It was shortly after his arrival that his new mistress taught him the alphabet. When her husband forbade her to continue her instruction, because it was unlawful to teach slaves how to read, Frederick took it upon himself to learn. He made the neighborhood boys his teachers, by giving away his food in exchange for lessons in reading and writing. At about the age of twelve or thirteen Douglass purchased a copy of The Columbian Orator, a popular schoolbook of the time, which helped him to gain an understanding and appreciation of the power of the spoken and the written word, as two of the most effective means by which to bring about permanent, positive change.
Frederick Douglass        Returning to the Eastern Shore, at approximately the age of fifteen, Douglass became a field hand, and experienced most of the horrifying conditions that plagued slaves during the 270 years of legalized slavery in America. But it was during this time that he had an encounter with the slavebreaker Edward Covey. Their fight ended in a draw, but the victory was Douglass’, as his challenge to the slavebreaker restored his sense of self-worth. After an aborted escape attempt when he was about eighteen, he was sent back to Baltimore to live with the Auld family, and in early September, 1838, at the age of twenty, Douglass succeeded in escaping from slavery by impersonating a sailor.
Frederick Douglass        He went first to New Bedford, Massachusetts, where he and his new wife Anna Murray began to raise a family. Whenever he could he attended abolitionist meetings, and, in October, 1841, after attending an anti-slavery convention on Nantucket Island, Douglass became a lecturer for the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society and a colleague of William Lloyd Garrison. This work led him into public speaking and writing. He published his own newspaper, The North Star, participated in the first women’s rights convention at Seneca Falls, in 1848, and wrote three autobiographies. He was internationally recognized as an uncompromising abolitionist, indefatigable worker for justice and equal opportunity, and an unyielding defender of women’s rights. He became a trusted advisor to Abraham Lincoln, United States Marshal for the District of Columbia, Recorder of Deeds for Washington, D.C., and Minister-General to the Republic of Haiti.

Frederick Douglass-One of the Great Black Leaders
Frederick Douglass sought to embody three keys for success in life:

  • Believe in yourself.
  • Take advantage of every opportunity.
  • Use the power of spoken and written language to effect positive change for yourself and society.

Douglass said, “What is possible for me is possible for you.” By taking these keys and making them his own, Frederick Douglass created a life of honor, respect and success that he could never have dreamed of when still a boy on Colonel Lloyd’s plantation on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.

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3) How did Douglass use traditional notions of what it means to be an American in order to build a characterization of himself that showed slaves could be “real” Americans?

Begin by thinking once again about how Douglass depicts himself in his writing, and then consider the ways in which other texts written by, for, or about “self-made” men provide a context for understanding Frederick Douglass’s representation of his own life and ideas. You’ll find the necessary resources at:

Frederick Douglass: Autobiography as Argument

Responses to Frederick Douglass–the Man and the “Character”–as Arguments For and Against Slavery

Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography

Nineteenth Century Conduct Books

A Popular Nineteenth Century Book for Boys: The Bobbin Boy or How Nat Got an Education


FROM THIS DAY IN HISTORY _ THE AMISTAD CASE

March 9, 1841
Supreme Court rules on Amistad mutiny.

jb_reform_amistad_2_e

At the end of a historic case, the U.S. Supreme Court rules, with only one dissent, that the African slaves who seized control of the Amistad slave ship had been illegally forced into slavery, and thus are free under American law.

In 1807, the U.S. Congress joined with Great Britain in abolishing the African slave trade, although the trading of slaves within the U.S. was not prohibited. Despite the international ban on the importation of African slaves, Cuba continued to transport captive Africans to its sugar plantations until the 1860s, and Brazil to its coffee plantations until the 1850s.

On June 28, 1839, 53 slaves recently captured in Africa left Havana, Cuba, aboard the Amistad schooner for a life of slavery on a sugar plantation at Puerto Principe, Cuba. Three days later, Sengbe Pieh, a Membe African known as Cinque, freed himself and the other slaves and planned a mutiny. Early in the morning of July 2, in the midst of a storm, the Africans rose up against their captors and, using sugar-cane knives found in the hold, killed the captain of the vessel and a crewmember. Two other crewmembers were either thrown overboard or escaped, and Jose Ruiz and Pedro Montes, the two Cubans who had purchased the slaves, were captured. Cinque ordered the Cubans to sail the Amistad east back to Africa. During the day, Ruiz and Montes complied, but at night they would turn the vessel in a northerly direction, toward U.S. waters. After almost nearly two difficult months at sea, during which time more than a dozen Africans perished, what became known as the “black schooner” was first spotted by American vessels.

On August 26, the USS Washington, a U.S. Navy brig, seized the Amistad off the coast of Long Island and escorted it to New London, Connecticut. Ruiz and Montes were freed, and the Africans were imprisoned pending an investigation of the Amistad revolt. The two Cubans demanded the return of their supposedly Cuban-born slaves, while the Spanish government called for the Africans’ extradition to Cuba to stand trial for piracy and murder. In opposition to both groups, American abolitionists advocated the return of the illegally bought slaves to Africa.

The story of the Amistad mutiny garnered widespread attention, and U.S. abolitionists succeeded in winning a trial in a U.S. court. Before a federal district court in Connecticut, Cinque, who was taught English by his new American friends, testified on his own behalf. On January 13, 1840, Judge Andrew Judson ruled that the Africans were illegally enslaved, that they would not be returned to Cuba to stand trial for piracy and murder, and that they should be granted free passage back to Africa. The Spanish authorities and U.S. President Martin Van Buren appealed the decision, but another federal district court upheld Judson’s findings. President Van Buren, in opposition to the abolitionist faction in Congress, appealed the decision again.

On February 22, 1841, the U.S. Supreme Court began hearing the Amistad case. U.S. Representative John Quincy Adams of Massachusetts, who served as the sixth president of the United States from 1825 to 1829, joined the Africans’ defense team. In Congress, Adams had been an eloquent opponent of slavery, and before the nation’s highest court he presented a coherent argument for the release of Cinque and the 34 other survivors of the Amistad.

On March 9, 1841, the Supreme Court ruled that the Africans had been illegally enslaved and had thus exercised a natural right to fight for their freedom. In November, with the financial assistance of their abolitionist allies, the Amistad Africans departed America aboard the Gentleman on a voyage back to West Africa. Some of the Africans helped establish a Christian mission in Sierra Leone, but most, like Cinque, returned to their homelands in the African interior. One of the survivors, who was a child when taken aboard the Amistad as a slave, eventually returned to the United States. Originally named Margru, she studied at Ohio’s integrated and coeducational Oberlin College in the late 1840s, before returning to Sierra Leone as evangelical missionary Sara Margru Kinson.


Blog about this….

We have been discussing the Underground Railroad and slavery for the past 4 weeks. Tell me what you remember? Describe slavery, tell what it was like.

Talk about the Underground Railroad and the Abolishionists ( Harriet Tubman, ect….)

Talk about the Slave trade or the Middle passage?


Creating a slave Narrative

Slave Narrative Click Here to Listen to a screencast of this blog post

What is a a Narrative?

A Narrative is story told by a person in the first person (“I am a slave”, as opposed to “He was a slave”)

What is a first hand account?

A first hand account is a story by someone who actually witnessed an event. We call it a first hand account when some one “was there”.
For example 50 years from now someway may want to interview you about what it was like when America elected it’s first African American President. You were there, you will remember, you are a witness to this history and you can give an accurate account about what it was really like from your perspective.

The Assignment

Our job is to pretend that we were slaves. That we lived and witnessed slavery in the United States. The U.S. government is trying to preserve the voices of slaves who are still alive. To get their “first hand accounts” written down before they all die. They have sent a man to interview you.
The time: it is 50 years after slavery ended 1915, write an account and tell what it was like by answering some or all of the following questions:

  • where did you live, State,?
  • did you live in a slave cabin or in the Masters house?
  • what job did you do, tell how hard it was and what you did?
  • what was the food like?
  • how did you feel?
  • were you ever beaten?
  • were you always afraid?
  • were you angry?
  • did you try to run away?
  • Did you escape on the Underground railroad?
  • What was that like?
  • What do you think of Abraham Lincoln, Harriet Tubman etc….
  • How did you feel when you heard that all slaves were now free
  • Use details, talk about everyday details that create a picture of slavery.

Get into character in your writing: How old are you now? What do you do now? How important is freedom to you and your family?

Use your imagination to create your “first hand account” of what it was like to be a slave.


Harriet Tubman

Today we are beginning our Start to finish book on Harriet Tubman

Click on the picture of Harriet to hear a jingcast of this post

Harriet Tubman (1820-1913, March 10th)

Harriet Tubman (1820-1913, March 10th)

Harriet Tubman is perhaps the most well-known of all the Underground Railroad’s “conductors.” During a ten-year span she made 19 trips into the South underground_railroadand escorted over 300 slaves to freedom. And, as she once proudly pointed out to frederick_douglasFrederick Douglass, in all of her journeys she “never lost a single passenger.”

Tubman was born a slave in plaque11947889Maryland’s Dorchester County around 1820. At age five or six, she began to work as a house servant. Seven years later she was sent to work in the fields.

While she was still in her early teens, she suffered an injury that would follow her for the rest of her life. Always ready to stand up for someone else, Tubman blocked a doorway to protect another field hand from an angry overseer. The overseer picked up and threw a two-pound weight at the field hand. It fell short, striking Tubman on the head. She never fully recovered from the blow, which subjected her to spells in which she would fall into a deep sleep.

Around 1844 she married a free black named John Tubman and took his last name. (She was born Araminta Ross; she later changed her first name to Harriet, after her mother.) In 1849, in fear that she, along with the other slaves on the plantation, was to be sold, Tubman resolved to run away.

Underground Railroad safe house- Maryland

Underground Railroad safe house- Maryland

House on the Underground Railroad- Maryland

She set out one night on foot. With some assistance from a friendly white woman, Tubman was on her way.

North Star or Pole star led runaways slaves to freedom in the north.

North Star or Pole star led runaways slaves to freedom in the north.

She followed the North Star by night, making her way to

Harriet went from Maryland to Pennsylvania

Harriet went from Maryland to Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania and soon after to Philadelphia, where she found work and saved her money.

The following year she returned to Maryland and escorted her sister and her sister’s two children to freedom.

Harriet Tubman with members of her family she helped escape

Harriet Tubman with members of her family she helped escape

She made the dangerous trip back to the South soon after to rescue her brother and two other men. On her third return, she went after her husband, only to find he had taken another wife. Undeterred, she found other slaves seeking freedom and escorted them to the North.

Tubman returned to the South again and again. She devised clever techniques that helped make her “forays” successful, including

Harriet often used Master's Horse and buggy to bring slaves to freedom

Harriet often used Master's Horse and buggy to bring slaves to freedom

using the master’s horse and buggy for the first leg of the journey; leaving on a Saturday night, since runaway notices

A runaway slave reward notice

A runaway slave reward notice

couldn’t be placed in newspapers until Monday morning; turning about and heading south if she encountered possible slave hunters; and carrying a drug to use on a baby if its crying might put the fugitives in danger. Tubman even carried a gun which she used to threaten the fugitives if they became too tired or decided to turn back, telling them, “You’ll be free or die.”

By 1856, Tubman’s capture would have brought a $40,000 reward from the South. On one occasion, she overheard some men reading her wanted poster, which stated that she was illiterate. She promptly pulled out a book and feigned reading it. The ploy was enough to fool the men.

Tubman had made the perilous trip to slave country 19 times by 1860, including one especially challenging journey in which she rescued her 70-year-old parents.

Harriet Tubman was called Moses  because she led her people to Freedom

Harriet Tubman was called Moses because she led her people to Freedom

Of the famed heroine, who became known as “Moses,” Frederick Douglass said, “Excepting John Brown — of sacred memory — I know of no one who has willingly encountered more perils and hardships to serve our enslaved people than [Harriet Tubman].”
And John Brown, who conferred with “General Tubman” about his plans to raid Harpers Ferry, once said that she was “one of the bravest persons on this continent.”

Becoming friends with the leading abolitionists of the day, Tubman took part in antislavery meetings. On the way to such a meeting in Boston in 1860, in an incident in Troy, New York, she helped a fugitive slave who had been captured.

During the Civil War Harriet Tubman worked for the Union as a cook, a nurse, and even a spy. After the war she settled in Auburn, New York, where she would spend the rest of her long life. She died in 1913.